Antiquarian Auctions

SA Auction #86 begins on 22 Oct 2020

US Auction #4 begins on 08 Oct 2020

Henry M Stanley

HOW I FOUND LIVINGSTONE. TRAVELS ADVENTURES AND DISCOVERIES IN CENTRAL AFRICA

Published: Scribner, New York, 1872

Edition: 1st

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Scribner, Armstrong & Co., New York, 1872. Cloth. Condition: Very Good. Henry M. Stanley (illustrator). xxiii, 736 pages, plus maps, plates, and 4 pages of ads at rear. All maps present and in excellent condition (with small repair along crease to the largest): 4 folding and 2 1-page. Publisher's decorative brown cloth and brown slate endpapers. Professional repair to spine, front endpaper and the large folding map at front. Binding is sound. Foxing from tissue guard to frontispiece and facing title page; contents otherwise clean. Heavy book. Size: thick 8vo.

Sir Henry Morton Stanley GCB (born John Rowlands; 28 January 1841 - 10 May 1904) was a Welsh journalist and explorer who was famous for his exploration of central Africa and his search for missionary and explorer David Livingstone. Upon finding Livingstone, Stanley reportedly asked, "Dr. Livingstone, I presume?" Stanley is also known for his search for the source of the Nile, his pioneering work later enabling the plundering of the Congo Basin region by King Leopold II of Belgium, and his command of the Emin Pasha Relief Expedition. He was knighted in 1899. In 1869 Stanley received instructions to undertake a roving commission in the Middle East, which was to include the relief of Dr. David Livingstone, of whom little had been heard since his departure for Africa in 1866 to search for the source of the Nile. Stanley travelled to Zanzibar in March 1871, later claiming that he outfitted an expedition with 192 porters. In his first dispatch to the New York Herald, however, he stated that his expedition numbered only 111. This was in line with figures in his diaries. Bennett, publisher of the New York Herald and funder of the expedition, had delayed sending to Stanley the money he had promised, so Stanley borrowed money from the United States Consul.: 93-94 During the 700-mile (1,100 km) expedition through the tropical forest, his thoroughbred stallion died within a few days after a bite from a tsetse fly, many of his porters deserted, and the rest were decimated by tropical diseases.

Stanley found Livingstone on 10 November 1871 in Ujiji, near Lake Tanganyika in present-day Tanzania. He may have greeted him with the now-famous line, "Doctor Livingstone, I presume?" It may also have been a fabrication, as Stanley tore out of his diary the pages relating to the encounter. Neither man mentioned it in any of the letters they wrote at this time. Livingstone's account of the encounter does not mention these words. The phrase is first quoted in a summary of Stanley's letters published by The New York Times on 2 July 1872. Stanley biographer Tim Jeal argued that the explorer invented it afterwards to help raise his standing because of "insecurity about his background".

  • Binding Condition: Very good
  • Overall Condition: Very good
  • Size: thick 8 vo
  • Sold By: White Eagle Books
  • Contact Person: Andrew Saidi
  • Country: United Kingdom
  • Email: andrewsaidi54@gmail.com
  • Telephone: 020 8997 9894
  • Preferred Payment Methods: Paypal
  • Trade Associations: PBFA IOBA


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